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  • 27-September-2021

    English

    Digital Government Review of Slovenia - Leading the Digital Transformation of the Public Sector

    This Digital Government Review of Slovenia explores how the Government of Slovenia could enhance and harness digital government to achieve broader strategic goals. It evaluates the efforts made so far by the Slovenian government in shifting towards a digital government approach by looking at institutional governance, institutional digital talent, public service delivery and the strategic use of data. The review provides policy recommendations to allow Slovenia to make the most of digital technologies to foster a citizen and data-driven administration and to enable and sustain the digital transformation of the public sector.
  • 22-September-2021

    English

    The human capital behind AI - Jobs and skills demand from online job postings

    Building on recent OECD work, this paper analyses the skills sets ('skills bundles') demanded in artificial intelligence (AI)-related online job postings. The analysis uses Burning Glass Technologies’ data for the United States and the United Kingdom and finds that skills related to the open source programming software Python and to machine learning represent 'must-haves' for working with AI. Employers additionally value specialised skills related to robotics, AI development and applying AI. A comparison of the periods 2013-15 and 2017-19 shows that the latter two have become more interrelated over time, with 'neural network' skills connecting both groups. Network analysis relating AI skills to general skills highlights the growing role of socio-emotional skills; and of skill bundles related to programming, management of big data and data analysis. Key results hold for both countries and time periods, though differences emerge across occupations and industries.
  • 22-September-2021

    English

    Who develops AI-related innovations, goods and services? - A firm-level analysis

    This study proposes an exploratory analysis of the characteristics of Artificial Intelligence (AI) 'actors'. It focuses on entities that deploy AI-related technologies or introduce AI-related goods and services on large international markets. It builds on the OECD Science, Technology and Innovation Micro-data Lab infrastructure, and, in particular, on Intellectual Property (IP) rights data (patents and trademarks) combined with company-level data. Statistics on AI-related patents and trademarks show that AI-related activities are strongly concentrated in some countries, sectors, and actors. Development of AI technologies and/or goods and services is mainly due to start-ups or large incumbents, located in the United States, Japan, Korea, or the People’s Republic of China, and, to a lesser extent, in Europe. A majority of these actors operate in ICT-related sectors. The composition of the IP portfolio of the AI actors indicates that AI is frequently combined with a variety of sector-specific technologies, goods, or services.
  • 3-septembre-2021

    Français

    Renforcer la résilience économique après la crise du COVID-19 (version abrégée) - Une analyse sous l’angle des entreprises et des secteurs

    Cette version abrégée est la traduction partielle de la version anglaise de la publication Renforcer la résilience économique après la crise du COVID-19 de l’OCDE. Elle contient le résumé de la publication ainsi que le chapitre 1 du rapport, qui propose une synthèse des enseignements sur la résilience économique des travailleurs, des entreprises et des industries. Ce chapitre résume également les principales recommandations politiques qui découlent de l'analyse de chaque chapitre thématique, et discute brièvement certains des grands défis économiques à venir.
  • 29-July-2021

    English

    Making life richer, easier and healthier - Robots, their future and the roles for public policy

    This paper addresses the current and emerging uses and impacts of robots, the mid-term future of robotics and the role of policy. Progress in robotics will help to make life easier, richer and healthier. Wider robot use will help raise labour productivity. As science and engineering progress, robots will become more central to crisis response, from helping combat infectious diseases to maintaining critical infrastructure. Governments can accelerate and orient the development and uptake of socially valuable robots, for instance by: supporting cross-disciplinary R&D, facilitating research commercialisation, helping small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) understand the opportunities for investment in robots, supporting platforms that highlight robot solutions in healthcare and other sectors, embedding robotics engineering in high school curricula, tailoring training for workers with vocational-level mechanical skills, supporting data development useful to robotics, ensuring flexible regulation conducive to innovation, strengthening digital connectivity, and raising awareness of the importance of robotics.
  • 29-juillet-2021

    Français

    Perspectives de l’économie numérique de l’OCDE 2020 (Version abrégée)

    Cette version abrégée est la traduction partielle de la version anglaise de l’édition 2020 des Perspectives de l’économie numérique de l’OCDE. Elle contient le résumé de l’ouvrage ainsi que le chapitre 2 où sont analysées les évolutions récentes des stratégies numériques nationales et les principales évolutions liées aux politiques centrées sur la connectivité, l’utilisation du numérique, la gouvernance des données, la sécurité, la protection de la vie privée, l’innovation, le travail et des technologies clés telles que l’intelligence artificielle (IA), la technologie du « blockchain » et l’informatique quantique.
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  • 21-July-2021

    English

    Measuring telework in the COVID-19 pandemic

    The COVID-19 crisis created a sudden need for businesses and their employees to take up or increase working from home. By facilitating teleworking, digital technologies have been crucial in allowing economic activities to endure and in enabling a significant portion of individuals to continue earning income. This paper brings together information on how teleworking has evolved during the COVID-19 pandemic. In particular, it looks at which businesses and individuals have been able to leverage it to keep working. It also presents the definitions and survey vehicles underlying the statistics presented.
  • 20-July-2021

    English

    Bridging connectivity divides

    As countries weather the COVID-19 health emergency, high-quality connectivity, more than ever, is essential to ensure that economic activities can continue in a remote manner. However, important disparities in terms of connectivity persist, aggravating the consequences of the health emergency. Therefore, policies aiming to reduce connectivity divides are of paramount importance. This report explores policies and regulations in OECD countries that have proven successful to work towards closing connectivity divides. It offers a roadmap to policy makers on the overarching policies and regulatory measures to expand connectivity, as well as the tailored approaches to extend broadband networks in rural and remote areas.
  • 19-July-2021

    English

    Empowering the health workforce to make the most of the digital revolution

    Digital technologies offer unique opportunities to strengthen health systems. However, the digital infrastructure only provide the tools, which on their own cannot transform the health systems, but need to be put to productive use by health workers. This report discusses how to engage and empower the health workforce to make the most of the digital revolution. While many health workers already use some digital tools and perceive the benefits that they bring to them and to patients, many also question the value digital technologies produce in health care or complain about technology getting in the way of work. Moreover, health workers often report not having sufficient opportunities for the up-skilling required to fully use new technologies or that the legal, financial, and organisational aspects of work – designed in the pre-digital era – do not enable them to reap the full benefits of these new technologies. Health workers and patients also demand appropriate safeguards against possible lack of transparency or threats to data privacy.
  • 15-July-2021

    English

    Transparency reporting on terrorist and violent extremist content online - An update on the global top 50 content sharing services

    This benchmarking report explores the degree to which the world’s top 50 online content-sharing services’ approaches to terrorist and violent extremist content (TVEC) online have evolved since a first report in 2020. This new edition finds there has been tangible progress: 11 services have issued TVEC-specific transparency reports over the past year (6 more than in 2020); and the 5 services that already issued such reports now provide additional information. However, transparency reports expressly addressing TVEC remain uncommon and services continue to use different metrics, definitions and reporting frequencies. It remains difficult to gain an industry-wide perspective on the efficacy of companies’ measures to combat TVEC online and how they may affect human rights. Meanwhile, there is a growing risk of regulatory fragmentation due to unco-ordinated transparency requirements across jurisdictions. There is an urgent need for increased, and more comparable, TVEC reporting.
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