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  • 18-January-2021

    English

    The effects of online disclosure about personalised pricing on consumers - Results from a lab experiment in Ireland and Chile

    Online personalised pricing is a form of price discrimination that involves charging different prices to different consumers, often based on a consumer’s personal data. Policymakers are currently discussing ways to protect consumers from potential adverse effects of personalised pricing. One option involves displaying disclosures on the websites of retailers that use personalised pricing, in order for consumers to make informed purchase decisions. This paper summarizes findings from a laboratory experiment on the effects that online disclosures about personalised pricing have on consumers. Results from the experiment suggest that online disclosures have only limited effects on consumers’ ability to identify and comprehend online personalised pricing, and cannot confirm a significant effect on participants’ purchasing behaviour. Results from a questionnaire distributed to participants reveal that on average personalised pricing is considered an unfair practice that should be prohibited.
  • 8-January-2021

    English

    Children in the digital environment - Revised typology of risks

    The digital environment has become an integral part of children’s everyday lives and interactions. The benefits can be tremendous, but there also risks. In 2011, the OECD adopted a Typology of Risks in an effort to broadly categorise those risks. Since then the digital environment has changed significantly, as risks have evolved in nature and new ones have emerged. This report informs the OECD’s broader work on children in the digital environment by examining these trends and presenting an updated Typology of Risks. The Typology provides a high-level overview of the risk landscape, and outlines four risk categories and their manifestations. The Typology also identifies and analyses risks that cut across these four risk categories, and that can therefore have wide-ranging effects on children’s lives.
  • 22-December-2020

    English

    Data localisation trends and challenges - Considerations for the review of the Privacy Guidelines

    This report highlights a complex situation in which some forms of data localisation are seen as useful and largely uncontroversial, while others as a significant barrier to the digital economy. Contributing to the review of the implementation of the OECD Privacy Guidelines, the report emphasises the need to recognise the effect that data localisation can have on transborder data flows, but suggests that the conditions that data privacy laws traditionally impose do not necessarily amount to data localisation measures. Focusing on data localisation in the context of data privacy and the governance of globalised data flows, the report proposes a definition for data localisation, outlines a roadmap to ensure that data localisation does not impede transborder data flows, and makes recommendations to support such work. In particular, it emphasises the relevance of the accountability principle and the proportionality test articulated in the OECD Privacy Guidelines in evaluating data localisation measures.
  • 15-December-2020

    English

    Perspectives on the value of data and data flows

    Data and databases are increasingly central to business activities today , with even relatively small data flows having the potential to create considerable economic value. Despite this, attempts to conceptualise and measure the value of data remain underdeveloped. This paper explores four different perspectives from which the value of data, databases, and data flows can be conceptualised and measured: i) how much businesses spend on storing data; ii) how much money businesses make from selling data-based products; iii) how the market valuation of 'data-driven firms' compares to that of other firms; and iv) the value of trade flows in digitally deliverable products.
  • 15-December-2020

    English

    OECD bundled communication price baskets

    Providing internationally comparable measures on prices of communication services has been a core task of the OECD through its Working Party on Communication Infrastructures and Services Policy (WPCISP) for decades. Currently, the majority of broadband services in OECD countries are based on bundled offers. This report develops OECD price baskets for bundled communication services to complement existing fixed and mobile price baskets. The baskets for bundled communication services range from dual play to quadruple play baskets, which include different combinations of fixed broadband, fixed voice, mobile voice and data, and pay-TV services. The report proposes 30 bundled baskets, accounting for different usage patterns and service elements. With increased convergence and the prevalence of communication bundles in the majority of OECD countries, this methodology sets a reference point for discussions on price baskets for bundled communication services in international fora.
  • 30-novembre-2020

    Français

    La crise du COVID-19 fait ressortir des disparités régionales croissantes sur les plans sanitaire et économique

    Les conséquences de la crise du COVID-19 sur les individus et les économies mettent en évidence un creusement des disparités régionales en matière d’accès aux soins de santé et de croissance économique ainsi qu’une persistance des disparités pour ce qui est de l’adoption des technologies numériques, et ce depuis une dizaine d’années, selon un nouveau rapport de l’OCDE.

    Documents connexes
  • 27-novembre-2020

    Français

    La crise du COVID-19 renforce la nécessité de combler les fractures numériques

    L’amélioration de l’accès à l’internet et des compétences numériques a aidé de nombreux pays à affronter la crise sanitaire et économique provoquée par la pandémie de COVID-19.

    Documents connexes
  • 20-November-2020

    English

    Encouraging digital security innovation - Global Forum on Digital Security for Prosperity

    This document summarises discussions held at the second annual event of the OECD Global Forum on Digital Security for Prosperity. The event, held on 14-15 November 2019 in London, brought together 160 experts and 30 speakers from government, business, civil society, the technical community and academia to discuss how to encourage digital security innovation. Participants explored the roles that different stakeholders can play in stimulating digital security innovation, including how governments can support it for example by implementing tax incentives, acting as an early customer for innovative products, and enacting flexible and outcome-based regulation. A digital security innovation ecosystem is the most important component of a strategic approach, as it brings together different stakeholder groups in a dedicated location. Participants discussed how different ecosystems can learn from one another through international co-operation and considered how governments can encourage digital security by design in innovation more generally.
  • 17-November-2020

    English

    Exploring policy options on teleworking - Steering local economic and employment development in the time of remote work

    This paper explores and classifies some of the most common policy options adopted by national, regional and local policy makers in the context of or prior to the COVID-19 pandemic to enable, encourage and make the most of teleworking. It also considers efforts to foster the attraction and retention of remote workers and entrepreneurs in particular places. The current crisis represents, among other things, a mass experiment in teleworking, unprecedented in size and scope. A shift towards large-scale, long-lasting teleworking would have profound implications for the geography of local employment. However, SMEs may be less equipped than larger firms to face this change. Public policy can play an important role in turning teleworking into an opportunity for all, to minimise the potential of widening pre-existing disparities between people, places and firms.
  • 17-November-2020

    English

    An insight into the innovative start-up landscape of Trentino - Is it time for the “Start-up Valley” to scale up?

    This paper offers an in-depth analysis of the characteristics of innovative start-up firms in Trentino, a high-income mountainous area in the North East of Italy. This work is part of a series of thematic papers on regional start-up landscapes in Italy, produced by the OECD Trento Centre for Local Development. Following the 2018 OECD Evaluation of the Italian Start-up Act, which embraced a national perspective, it represents a first attempt to analyse the impact of this policy at the local level. Among Italian regions, Trentino boasts the highest density of registered innovative start-ups over all young firms established locally. However, innovative start-ups spread unevenly throughout this territory, concentrating in urban areas. Female and young founders are less prevalent than in Italy at large. Firm dynamism, in particular high-growth and exit trends, the uptake of emerging technologies among local start-ups as well as their propensity to use national incentives are other key areas of this work, which concludes with a set of evidence-based recommendations for policy makers.
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