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  • 2-December-2021

    English

    Jobs for Rural Youth - The Role of Local Food Economies

    Today, the global youth population is at its highest ever and still growing, with the highest proportion of youth living in Africa and Asia, and a majority of them in rural areas. Young people in rural areas face the double challenge of age-specific vulnerabilities and underdevelopment of rural areas. While agriculture absorbs the majority of rural workers in developing countries, low pay and poor working conditions make it difficult to sustain rural livelihoods. Potential job opportunities for rural youth exist in agriculture and along the agri-food value chain, however. Growing populations, urbanisation and rising incomes of the working class are increasing demand for more diverse and higher value added agricultural and food products in Africa and developing Asia. This demand will create a need for off-farm labour, especially in agribusinesses, which tends to be better paid and located in rural areas and secondary towns. It could boost job creation in the food economy provided that local food systems were mobilised to take up the challenge of higher and changing domestic demand for food.
  • 17-November-2021

    English

    Entrepreneurship in Regional Innovation Clusters - Case Study of Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai, Thailand

    This report evaluates how to strengthen Thailand's SME and entrepreneurship policies to promote innovative entrepreneurship and SME innovation at regional level. This is critical in supporting a shift towards a more innovation-driven and regionally-balanced economy in Thailand. The report illustrates the needs by taking a specific policy case, namely activating new and small firms in the development of an innovation cluster in the advanced agriculture and biotechnology and food for the future sectors in Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai regions in northern Thailand. The report examines policy options in four major areas affecting the cluster: strengthening the local entrepreneurship ecosystem for example in scale-up finance and entrepreneurial culture; upgrading business development services so they that the match the requirements of SME innovation; attracting foreign direct investment and brokering supply chain linkages with local SMEs; and creating a cluster management organisation to co-ordinate policy. The report makes policy recommendations illustrated by international inspiring policy practice examples in each area. It shares a vision for translating Thailand's new-found biotechnology research strengths into economic development by stimulating innovation absorption by SMEs and commercialisation by start-ups and scale-ups.
  • 23-July-2021

    English

    Vocational Education and Training in Thailand

    One of a series of studies on vocational education and training, this review assesses vocational education and training (VET) in Thailand and provides policy recommendations. VET has the potential to provide relevant education and training opportunities to young people and adults in Thailand, especially as the demand for technical skills is high. This can be achieved by building on the strengths of the system, including a strong postsecondary vocational system and a small but dynamic dual system. However, it remains an unattractive option for many students in Thailand, because of a poor image among students and parents, quality issues, a hard-to-navigate system and limited progression pathways. Additional efforts are therefore needed to align the mix of provision with the needs of the Thai labour market. This review provides recommendations on how to improve access to programmes, reduce inequalities in access to high-quality institutions and programmes, make better use of skills intelligence to inform education and training policies, and engage employers in the design and delivery of vocational education and training, including work-based learning.
  • 10-juin-2021

    Français

    Financer l’extension de l’assurance sociale aux travailleurs de l’économie informelle à l’aide des transferts de fonds

    L'emploi informel, défini par l'absence de protection sociale basée sur l'emploi, constitue la majeure partie de l'emploi dans les pays en développement, et entraîne un niveau de vulnérabilité à la pauvreté et à d'autres risques qui sont supportés par tous ceux qui dépendent des revenus du travail informel. Les résultats de la base de données des Indicateurs clés de l’informalité en fonction des individus et leurs ménages (KIIbIH) montrent qu'un nombre disproportionné de travailleurs de l'économie informelle de la classe moyenne reçoivent des transferts de fonds. Ces résultats confirment que les stratégies de gestion des risques, telles que la migration, jouent un rôle dans la minimisation des risques potentiels du travail informel pour les ménages informels de la classe moyenne qui peuvent ne pas être éligibles à l'aide sociale. Ils suggèrent en outre que les travailleurs informels de classe moyenne peuvent avoir une demande solvable d'assurance sociale, de sorte que, si des régimes d'assurance sociale adaptés aux besoins des travailleurs informels leur étaient accessibles, les transferts de fonds pourraient potentiellement être canalisés pour financer l'extension de l'assurance sociale à l'économie informelle.
  • 2-March-2021

    English

    Towards a Skills Strategy for Southeast Asia - Skills for Post-COVID Recovery and Growth

    Skills are central to the capacity of countries and people to thrive in a rapidly changing world. Recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic will require countries to co-ordinate interventions to help recent graduates find jobs, reactivate the skills of displaced workers and use skills effectively in workplaces. Megatrends such as globalisation, climate change, technological progress and demographic change will continue to reshape work and society. Countries should take action now to develop and use more effectively the skills required for the world of the future and at the same time make their skills systems more resilient and adaptable in the context of change and uncertainty. The OECD Skills Strategy provides countries with a strategic approach to assess their skills challenges and opportunities. The foundation of this approach is the OECD Skills Strategy framework allowing countries to explore how they can improve i) developing relevant skills, ii) using skills effectively, and iii) strengthening the governance of the skills system. This report applies the OECD Skills Strategy framework to Southeast Asia, providing an overview of the region’s skills challenges and opportunities in the context of COVID-19 and megatrends, and identifying good practices for improving skills outcomes. This report lays the foundation for a more fully elaborated Skills Strategy for Southeast Asia.
  • 31-mai-2018

    Français

    Pour une croissance plus inclusive en Thaïlande

    L’essor de la Thaïlande au cours des décennies récentes, d’un pays à bas revenu à un pays à revenu moyen supérieur, est généralement salué comme un succès en matière de développement.

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  • 1-March-2013

    English

    Southeast Asian Economic Outlook 2013 - With Perspectives on China and India

    This edition of the Southeast Asian Economic Outlook examines medium-term growth prospects, recent macroeconomic policy challenges, and structural challenges including human capital, infrastructure and SME development.  It also looks at economic disparities 'between' and 'within' countries in the region.  It provides coverage for Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam. While solid growth is forecast to continue until 2017, countries must address structural issues in order to sustain this favourable outlook. Narrowing development gaps presents one of the region’s most important challenges.
  • 8-August-2012

    English

  • 5-July-2010

    English, , 3,164kb

    Employment and Skills Strategies in Southeast Asia: Setting the Scene

    This report identifies and discusses employment and skills strategies in Southeast Asia. The aim of the exercise is to identify a number of characteristics and trends of employment and skills development in the region which can be explored and addressed further by the ESSSA initiative.

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  • 1-December-2009

    English

    Southeast Asia Regional Policy Network on Education and Skills

    The rapidly developing Southeast Asia region is confronted with significant labour market challenges. This initiative aims to address the issues of employment and skills, especially through an interaction platform for members.

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