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Colombie


  • 21-July-2022

    English

    Culture and the Creative Economy in Colombia - Leveraging the Orange Economy

    In 2017, Colombia launched a novel public policy to stimulate the creative economy, building on the success of previous policy initiatives to support the cultural and creative sectors. The Orange Economy policy is unique for its transversal approach to supporting the creative economy and mainstreaming culture across diverse policy portfolios, beyond cultural policy. The report provides a comparative overview of Colombia’s culture and creative sectors relative to OECD peers and reviews progress in policy implementation. It provides a specific focus on Colombia’s push to foster creative districts as tool for local development across the country, including policy examples based on nine districts across the globe. The report maps the financial ecosystem for the creative economy in Colombia. Recommendations draw on international good practice to suggest ways Colombia can best leverage creative economy opportunities.
  • 13-June-2022

    English

    International Summer School for community and local development in Latin America and the Caribbean

    The School organises specialised courses on socio-economic development and creates an international platform to exchange experiences and knowledge between public officers and practitioners from Latin America and the Caribbean that deals with cooperation and local development issues.

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  • 1-June-2022

    English

    OECD Reviews of Labour Market and Social Policies: Colombia 2022

    In 2020, Colombia joined the OECD as the 37th Member of the Organisation, bringing to a successful conclusion an accession process that began in 2013. During the accession process, Colombia made important reforms and progress in the area of labour market and social policies, converging towards OECD best policies and practices. However, the OECD invited the Colombian government to continue its reform agenda in four areas in particular: (1) labour informality and subcontracting; (2) labour law enforcement; (3) collective bargaining; and (4) crimes against trade unionists. This report is the first assessment since Colombia’s accession to the OECD.
  • 28-October-2021

    English

    How’s Life in Latin America? - Measuring Well-being for Policy Making

    Many Latin American countries have experienced improvements in income over recent decades, with several of them now classified as high-income or upper middle-income in terms of conventional metrics. But has this change been mirrored in improvements across the different areas of people’s lives? How’s Life in Latin America? Measuring Well-being for Policy Making addresses this question by presenting comparative evidence for Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) with a focus on 11 LAC countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay). Spanning material conditions, quality of life, resources for future well-being, and inequalities, the report presents available evidence on well-being both before and since the onset of the pandemic, based on the OECD Well-being Framework. It also identifies priorities for addressing well-being gaps and describes how well-being frameworks are used in policy within Latin America and elsewhere around the world, providing lessons for governments on what is needed to put people’s well-being at the centre of their action. The report is part of the EU Regional Facility for Development in Transition for Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • 4-October-2021

    English

    Education-occupation mismatch in the context of informality and development

    Using household data from 15 countries in Latin America and Africa, this paper explores linkages between informality and education-occupation matching. The paper applies a unified methodology to measuring education-occupation mismatches and informality, consistently with the international labour and statistical standards in this area. The results suggest that in the majority of low- and middle-income developing countries with available data, workers in informal jobs have higher odds of being undereducated as compared to workers in formal jobs. Workers in formal jobs, in contrast, have higher chances of being overeducated. These results are consistent for dependent as well as for independent workers. They also hold for men and for women according to the gender-disaggregated analysis. Moreover, in the majority of countries considered in this paper, the matching-informality nexus is also related to the extent of informality in a given area: in labour markets with higher informality, informal workers in particular have a higher chance of being undereducated. The paper discusses policy implications of these findings.
  • 5-March-2021

    English, PDF, 2,199kb

    First post-accession report of Colombia to the Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Committee of the OECD

    This is the first post accession report presenting the specific progress of Colombia in each of the post-access recommendations on labour issues, which was delivered by the Ministry of Labour of Colombia to the Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Committee of the OECD (ELSAC).

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  • 30-June-2020

    English

    Making the Most of Technology for Learning and Training in Latin America

    Digitalisation is transforming the world of work and societies, and creating opportunities to learn and develop skills in new ways, times and places. The adoption and use of digital technologies can help Latin American countries close the skills gap with more advanced economies. Making the Most of Technology for Learning and Training in Latin America demonstrates how Latin American countries can realise the potential of new technologies for skills development in schools and all stages of life. It identifies barriers to accessing ICT infrastructure and connectivity limitations in Latin America, and provides recommendations on how they can be overcome to ensure that all students and citizens can benefit from new technologies for learning. The report explores the relationship between technology use in initial education and students’ performance in Latin America, and how policies can best support teachers as digital tools enter their classrooms. Digitalisation provides new opportunities for lifelong learning and this report examines the potential of open education and MOOCs in reaching those adults who are most in need of training in Latin American countries.
  • 25-October-2019

    English

    OECD Reviews of Digital Transformation: Going Digital in Colombia

    OECD Reviews of Digital Transformation: Going Digital in Colombia analyses recent developments of the digital economy in the country, reviews policies related to digitalisation and makes recommendations to increase policy coherence in this area. The report examines recent developments in infrastructures for the digital economy, telecom markets and related regulations and policies in Colombia. It reviews trends in the use of digital technologies by individuals, businesses and the government, and examines policies to foster diffusion. The report also examines opportunities and challenges raised by digitalisation for production, innovation, jobs and skills. The report reconsiders these policies in relation to their coherence among different domains and in order to foster synergies across government ministries, levels and institutions, based on the integrated policy framework of the OECD's Going Digital: Making the Transformation Work for Growth and Well-being project.
  • 23-février-2018

    Français

    Les dépenses publiques liées à l'éducation et la performance des étudiants en Colombie

    Cet article étudie si l'augmentation des dépenses publiques dans l'éducation et de meilleures qualifications des enseignants sont liées à la performance des élèves, d'après les données de Sabre 11, un test national standardisé mené par l'Instituto Colombiano para la Evaluación de la Educación.

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  • 18-octobre-2017

    Français

    Vers une croissance plus inclusive en Colombie

    La croissance est devenue plus inclusive en Colombie ces dernières années. Une croissance forte et des politiques sociales bien ciblées ont permis de réduire la pauvreté absolue.

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