Share

Publications


  • 30-June-2020

    English

    Making the Most of Technology for Learning and Training in Latin America

    Digitalisation is transforming the world of work and societies, and creating opportunities to learn and develop skills in new ways, times and places. The adoption and use of digital technologies can help Latin American countries close the skills gap with more advanced economies. Making the Most of Technology for Learning and Training in Latin America demonstrates how Latin American countries can realise the potential of new technologies for skills development in schools and all stages of life. It identifies barriers to accessing ICT infrastructure and connectivity limitations in Latin America, and provides recommendations on how they can be overcome to ensure that all students and citizens can benefit from new technologies for learning. The report explores the relationship between technology use in initial education and students’ performance in Latin America, and how policies can best support teachers as digital tools enter their classrooms. Digitalisation provides new opportunities for lifelong learning and this report examines the potential of open education and MOOCs in reaching those adults who are most in need of training in Latin American countries.
  • 29-June-2020

    English

    Test No. 458: Stably Transfected Human Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activation Assay for Detection of Androgenic Agonist and Antagonist Activity of Chemicals

    This Test Guideline describes in vitro assays, which use Androgen Receptor TransActivation (ARTA) to detect Androgen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists. The ARTA assay methods are mechanistically and functionally similar test methods that provide information on the transcription and translation of a reporter gene following the binding of a chemical to the androgen receptor and subsequent transactivation. The cell lines used in these assays express AR and have been stably transfected with an AR-responsive luciferase reporter gene, and are used to identify chemicals that activate (i.e. act as agonist) or inhibit (i.e. act as antagonists) AR-dependent transcription. Some chemicals may, in a cell type-dependent manner, display both agonist and antagonist activity and are known as selective AR modulators. The AR is activated following ligand binding, after which the receptor-ligand complex binds to specific DNA responsive elements and transactivates the receptor gene, resulting in an increase cellular expression of the luciferase enzyme. The enzyme then transforms the substrate to a bioluminescent product that can be quantitatively measured with a luminometer. This Test Guideline includes ARTA assays using the AR-EcoScreenTM cell line, the AR-CALUX® cell line, and 22Rv1/MMTV_GR-KO cell line.
  • 29-June-2020

    English

    Test No. 491: Short Time Exposure In Vitro Test Method for Identifying i) Chemicals Inducing Serious Eye Damage and ii) Chemicals Not Requiring Classification for Eye Irritation or Serious Eye Damage

    This Test Guideline describes a cytotoxicity-based in vitro assay that is performed on a confluent monolayer of Statens Seruminstitut Rabbit Cornea (SIRC) cells, cultured on a 96-well polycarbonate microplate. After five-minute exposure to a test chemical, the cytotoxicity is quantitatively measured as the relative viability of SIRC cells using the MTT assay. Decreased cell viability is used to predict potential adverse effects leading to ocular damage. Cell viability is assessed by the quantitative measurement, after extraction from the cells, of blue formazan salt produced by the living cells by enzymatic conversion of the vital dye MTT, also known as Thiazolyl Blue Tetrazolium Bromide. The obtained cell viability is compared to the solvent control (relative viability) and used to estimate the potential eye hazard of the test chemical. A test chemical is classified as UN GHS Category 1 when both the 5% and 0.05% concentrations result in a cell viability smaller than or equal to (≤) 70%. Conversely, a chemical is predicted as UN GHS No Category when both 5% and 0.05% concentrations result in a cell viability higher than (>) 70%.
  • 29-June-2020

    English

    Test No. 405: Acute Eye Irritation/Corrosion

    This method provides information on health hazard likely to arise from exposure to test substance (liquids, solids and aerosols) by application on the eye. This Test Guideline is intended preferably for use with albino rabbit. The test substance is applied in a single dose in the conjunctival sac of one eye of each animal. The other eye, which remains untreated, serves as a control. The initial test uses an animal; the dose level depends on the test substance nature. A confirmatory test should be made if a corrosive effect is not observed in the initial test, the irritant or negative response should be confirmed using up to two additional animals. It is recommended that it be conducted in a sequential manner in one animal at a time, rather than exposing the two additional animals simultaneously. The duration of the observation period should be sufficient to evaluate fully the magnitude and reversibility of the effects observed. The eyes should be examined at 1, 24, 48, and 72 hours after test substance application. The ocular irritation scores should be evaluated in conjunction with the nature and severity of lesions, and their reversibility or lack of reversibility. Use of topical anesthetics and systemic analgesics to avoid or minimize pain and distress in ocular safety testing procedures is described.
  • 26-June-2020

    English

    Foreign language teachers as ambassadors of multilingualism and international exchange - Evidence from TALIS 2018

    In today’s world, globalisation, technological innovation and human migration have made interactions between people from different countries and cultures almost inevitable. In this context, being able to communicate in more than one language has become a key skill with important economic benefits for individuals and economies. However, the relevance of learning other languages goes beyond improving communication: it also promotes the understanding of the complexity of cultures and languages and allows students to learn about other visions of the world. These are important prerequisites for active participation in a globalised world. Therefore, learning a foreign language can act as a powerful tool to increase intercultural skills, enhance global co-operation and discover new and innovative ways of thinking and working together. Being aware of these benefits, many countries are placing increased emphasis on foreign language teaching.
  • 25-June-2020

    English

    Who can log in? The importance of skills for the feasibility of teleworking arrangements across OECD countries

    COVID-19 lockdowns have radically changed the working arrangements for millions of workers. But who are the workers best positioned to work from home? Drawing on data from the OECD Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC), we show that workers possessing higher levels of skills are significantly more likely to telework in OECD countries. We show that while 30% of workers could telework across the OECD, the likelihood decreases for workers without tertiary education and with lower levels of numeracy and literacy skills. The findings raise important questions with respect to the extent to which the pandemic could exacerbate existing labour market inequalities, and the extent to which these inequalities could further worsen amidst intensified technology adoption in the pandemic’s aftermath.
  • 25-June-2020

    English

    Do sound infrastructure governance and regulation affect productivity growth? New insights from firm level data

    Measuring the quality of governance and regulation in various ways and focusing on energy, transport and telecommunications, this paper shows that both sound governance of infrastructure investment and pro-competitive regulation in network industries are associated with stronger productivity growth in firms operating downstream.
  • 25-June-2020

    English

    The Role of Sovereign and Strategic Investment Funds in the Low-carbon Transition

    Sovereign wealth funds manage a large share of the world’s invested capital. The action or inaction of these funds on climate finance is of crucial importance to the world’s ability to reach the goals of the Paris Agreement, and restrain global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius. However, sovereign wealth funds have so far played a very limited role in climate finance. This report provides guidance on how governments can support their sovereign wealth funds in becoming climate-aligned commercial investors. The establishment of synergies between sovereign wealth funds and strategic investment funds can help scale up investments in clean-energy infrastructure.
  • 25-June-2020

    English

    Technological diffusion and managing the associated economic transitions in Ireland

    Technological change is transforming Ireland’s economic structures, leading to new jobs and innovative products that benefit consumers. Adoption of new technologies by businesses has been high relative to many other OECD economies, but it has been uneven across industries and the impact on productivity growth in most firms has been modest so far.
  • 24-June-2020

    English

    Over the Rainbow? The Road to LGBTI Inclusion

    Ensuring that LGBTI people – i.e. lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgender and intersex individuals – can live as who they are without being discriminated against or attacked is a concern worldwide. Discrimination against LGBTI people remains pervasive, while its cost is massive. It lowers investment in human capital due to bullying at school. It also reduces economic output by excluding LGBTI talents from the labour market and impairing their mental health, hence their productivity. This report provides a comprehensive overview of the extent to which laws in OECD countries ensure equal treatment of LGBTI people, and of the complementary policies that could help foster LGBTI inclusion. The report first identifies the legislative and regulatory frameworks in the areas of civil rights, protection against discrimination and violence, as well as health that are critical for the inclusion of sexual and gender minorities. The report then explores whether these laws are in force in OECD countries and examines the margin for further improvement. Finally, the report investigates the broader policy measures that should accompany LGBTI-inclusive laws in order to strengthen the inclusion of LGBTI people.
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>