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  • 14-March-2019

    English

    Community Education and Training in South Africa

    Adult learning systems play a crucial role in helping people adapt to the changing world of work and develop relevant skills. Community Education and Training has been brought forward as a possible way to foster adult learning in South Africa, especially among disadvantaged groups. South Africa has a relatively large group of adults who have low levels of education and skills, and limited opportunities for skills development. This report looks at the potential role that Community Education and Training could play in South Africa, how the system should be financed, how to align the training offer with community needs, and how to ensure high-quality provision. The report provides international good practise examples and suggests actions that South African stakeholders might consider to develop the Community Education and Training system.
  • 11-February-2019

    French, PDF, 1,614kb

    Skills-GSR-Future Ready Adult Learning Systems FR

    Skills-Getting Skills Right-Future Ready Adult Learning Systems FR

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  • 11-February-2019

    English, PDF, 396kb

    Skills-GSR-Future Ready Adult Learning Systems EN

    Skills-Getting Skills Right-Future Ready Adult Learning Systems EN

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  • 20-December-2018

    English

    Working Better with Age: Japan

    Currently, Japan has the highest old-age dependency ratio of all OECD countries, with a ratio in 2017 of over 50 persons aged 65 and above for every 100 persons aged 20 to 64. This ratio is projected to rise to 79 per hundred in 2050. The rapid population ageing in Japan is a major challenge for achieving further increases in living standards and ensuring the financial sustainability of public social expenditure. However, with the right policies in place, there is an opportunity to cope with this challenge by extending working lives and making better use of older workers' knowledge and skills. This report investigates policy issues and discusses actions to retain and incentivise the elderly to work more by further reforming retirement policies and seniority-wages, investing in skills to improve productivity and keeping up with labour market changes through training policy, and ensuring good working conditions for better health with tackling long-hours working culture.
  • 11-December-2018

    English

    How demanding are activation requirements for jobseekers

    This paper presents new information on activity-related eligibility criteria for unemployment and related benefits in OECD- and EU-countries in 2017, comparing the strictness of “demanding” elements built into unemployment benefits across countries and over time.

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  • 11-December-2018

    English, PDF, 231kb

    Profiling Policy Brief

    Profiling tools, which assess the job finding prospects of jobseekers, differentiate jobseekers likely to become long-term unemployed from jobseekers likely to find work quickly. Thereby they help to deliver employment services more efficiently.

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  • 4-December-2018

    English

    Good Jobs for All in a Changing World of Work - The OECD Jobs Strategy

    The digital revolution, globalisation and demographic changes are transforming labour markets at a time when policy makers are also struggling with persistently slow productivity and wage growth and high levels of income inequality. The new OECD Jobs Strategy provides a comprehensive framework and detailed policy analysis and recommendations to help countries promote not only strong job creation but also foster job quality and inclusiveness as central policy priorities, while emphasising the importance of resilience and adaptability for good economic and labour market performance in a rapidly changing world of work. The key message is that flexibility-enhancing policies in product and labour markets are necessary but not sufficient. Policies and institutions that protect workers, foster inclusiveness and allow workers and firms to make the most of ongoing changes are also needed to promote good and sustainable outcomes.'The OECD’s latest Jobs Strategy is a smart and sensible updating and rethinking of how countries should advance the goal of shared prosperity. I hope policymakers around the world not only read it but take its important advice.'Jason Furman, Professor Harvard Kennedy School and former Chairman of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers 'Inequality, economic insecurity, economic exclusion, are making the headlines.  Anger is high, populist rhetoric is on the rise.   What can be done?  What strategies to adopt?  These are the challenging questions taken up by the new OECD Jobs Strategy report.  I hope the report triggers the very serious discussions these issues deserve.'  Olivier Blanchard, Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute, Emeritus Professor at MIT and former Chief Economist of the IMF
  • 30-November-2018

    English

    Profiling tools and their use in active labour market policies

    Jobseeker profiling procedures allocate jobseekers across a small number of categories, in order to manage scarce resources and deliver services that are appropriate for the needs of each group.

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  • 26-October-2018

    English

    Ageing and Employment Policies - Statistics on average effective age of retirement

    One indicator of retirement behaviour that abstracts from more general factorsaffecting the level of participation rates is the average effective age at which older workers withdraw from the labour force

  • 24-October-2018

    English

    Working Better with Age: Korea

    Korea faces unique ageing and employment challenges. On the one hand, it will experience much faster population ageing than any other OECD country: the old-age dependency ratio (population aged 65+ over population aged 15-64), for example, is projected to increase from 20% today to around 70% in 2050. On the other hand, employment rates of older workers are already very high: in the age group 65-69, for example, 45% of all Koreans work compared with an OECD average of 25% (2016 data). However, most older people in Korea end up in poor-quality jobs after ending their core career in their early 50s, with low and insecure earnings and little or no social protection. This report looks at the reasons for the current labour market and income situation of older workers in Korea, especially the role of employment and employer practices. It examines the best ways forward for policy makers and employers to increase the quality of life and work of older workers whilst maintaining their high employment rate.
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