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  • 12-February-2019

    English, PDF, 3,252kb

    How can we help stop child labour (Policy brief)

    Eradicating the worst forms of child labour is not only a moral imperative, it is also essential for ensuring that children can fully enjoy their childhood and fulfil their potential. To reach this goal, it is necessary to monitor child labour trends and identify the forms of child labour that have the most serious consequences on children’s lives.

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  • 7-January-2019

    English

    OECD Policy Workshop on Enhancing Child Well-being, 16th January 2019

    A policy workshop held at the OECD headquarters on the 16th January 2019 consisting of four sessions of a panel discussions among key experts and civil society, to discuss how to make poverty reduction policies more effective and sustainable for the hardest to reach population groups and how best to meet the multiple needs of families.

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  • 31-October-2018

    English

    Child poverty in the OECD : Trends, determinants and policies to tackle it (OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers No. 218)

    This paper provides an overview of the main trends in child income poverty since the mid-2000s, and explores to what extent child poverty trends are linked to demographic, policy and/or labour market changes. Trends in poverty and the standard of living of children in low-income families since the onset of the Great Recession are also closely examined.

  • 15-October-2018

    English, PDF, 662kb

    Poor children in rich countries: Why we need policy action (Policy brief)

    Today, nearly 1 in 7 children lives in poverty on average in the OECD, and children often face higher poverty risks than other population groups. To tackle the issue, this policy brief says that a significant reduction in child poverty can be achieved through better coverage and targeting of benefits towards poor children. Among the other recommendations are making work pay for both parents ...

  • 14-May-2018

    English

    Is the Last Mile the Longest? Economic Gains from Gender Equality in Nordic Countries

    Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, commonly known as the Nordic countries, have been leaders in the development of modern family and gender policy, and the explicit promotion of gender equality at home, at work, and in public life. Today, on many measures, they boast some of the most gender-equal labour markets in the OECD.This report shows that improvements in gender equality have contributed considerably to economic growth in the Nordic countries. Increases in female employment alone are estimated to account for anywhere between roughly 0.05 and 0.40 percentage points to average annual GDP per capita growth – equivalent to 3 to 20% of total GDP per capita growth over the past 50 years or so, depending on the country.The Nordic countries are closer than most to achieving gender equality in the labour market. But the last mile may well prove to be the longest one. To make further progress, a continued assessment of the effectiveness of existing public policies and workplace practices is needed. Only with resolve and a continued focus can Nordic countries ensure that men and women contribute to their economies and societies in gender equal measure. 
  • 14-May-2018

    English

    2018 OECD Social Policy Forum and Ministerial Meeting

    On May 15th 2018, Ministers responsible for Social Policy in over 35 OECD and partner countries will meet in Montréal to exchange their views on their countries’ challenges, opportunities, and best practices in social protection in a Ministerial meeting entitled Social Policy for Shared Prosperity: Embracing the Future.

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  • 16-November-2017

    English

    Child Well-Being Data Portal

    The OECD Child Well-Being Data Portal gathers data on child well-being and the settings in which children grow up. It provides information on children’s home and family environment, their health and safety, their education and school life, their activities and their life satisfaction, and also links to information on public policies for children.

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  • 19-October-2017

    English

    Better Family Policies can help combine work and family commitments: Lessons from OECD countries

    I am delighted to be in Seoul, at the Joint Conference on Low Fertility, Challenges and Responses in the Era of Ageing Population. Let me first take this opportunity to thank our hosts: the Ministry of Health and Welfare and the Korean Institute of Health and Social Affairs (KIHASA). Our thanks also go to the Governments of Japan and China as well as to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) for their support.

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  • 4-October-2017

    English

    The Pursuit of Gender Equality - An Uphill Battle

    Gender inequalities persist in all areas of social and economic life and across countries. Young women in OECD countries generally obtain more years of schooling than young men, but women are less likely than men to engage in paid work. Gaps widen with age, as motherhood typically has marked negative effects on gender pay gaps and career advancement. Women are also less likely to be entrepreneurs, and are underrepresented in private and public leadership positions.The 2013 and 2015 OECD Gender Recommendations provide guidance on how to advance gender equality in education, employment, entrepreneurship and public life; this book discusses recent developments in these areas in one overview chapter and 24 short chapters which each include key findings and policy recommendations. Topics include violence against women, gender budgeting, the unequal sharing of unpaid work, labour market outcomes and migration. The book presents a range of indicators illustrating gender gaps. It also discusses recent policy initiatives, such as pay transparency measures to reduce gender wage gaps and policy reform aimed at fathers taking parental leave. Overall, progress has been slow and there is a strong need for further policy action to close gender gaps in education, employment, entrepreneurship and public life.
  • 28-June-2017

    English

    LGBTI inclusiveness

    Despite a shift toward greater acceptance in most OECD countries, homo-, trans- and intersexphobia remain widespread, thereby putting LGBTI at risk of being discriminated against in dimensions critical for their well-being: family life, education, economic outcomes and health.

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