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Publications & Documents


  • 12-September-2023

    English

    Production Transformation Policy Review of Bangladesh - Investing in the Future of a Trading Nation

    Half a century after independence, Bangladesh has achieved impressive progress. The country has transformed from one of the poorest nations into a global textile manufacturing hub capable of meeting its medical needs almost entirely through domestic pharmaceutical production. The country will graduate from the least developed country (LDC) category in 2026 and aspires to be a high-income nation through industrialisation by 2041. Meeting this challenge requires accelerating economic transformation through diversification and innovation. This Production Transformation Policy Review (PTPR), implemented with the support and collaboration of the European Union (EU), and in partnership with the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), identifies concrete options for supporting Bangladesh’s development. It calls for leveraging digitalisation to address persistent fragilities and it advocates for a new pact based on shared responsibilities between the national government, the private sector and international partners to shift to a new development phase and ensure sustainable, smooth and irreversible graduation.
  • 11-September-2023

    English

    DAC Network on Gender Equality (GenderNet)

    The DAC Network on Gender Equality (GenderNet) is the only international forum where experts from development co-operation agencies meet to define common approaches in support of gender equality and women's rights.

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  • 8-September-2023

    English

    Digital Government Review of Latin America and the Caribbean - Building Inclusive and Responsive Public Services

    This report explores how governments in Latin America and the Caribbean can use digital technology and data to foster responsiveness, resilience and proactiveness in the public sector. This report looks at governance frameworks, digital government capabilities, data-driven public sector, public service design and delivery, and digital innovation in the public sector. It identifies trends, challenges, strengths, and opportunities for cross-border collaboration and provides policy recommendations to achieve an efficient and sustainable digital transformation of governments across the region.
  • 8-September-2023

    English

    City shapes and climate change in Africa

    Africa is undergoing an unprecedented urban and climate transition; yet, given the right conditions, compact urban forms can encourage greater sustainability, resilience and liveability in the coming decades. Using novel techniques and newly available data, this report fills in existing data gaps by producing measures of compactness for 5 625 urban agglomerations, along with other urban form attributes. Even though urbanisation is often unplanned and uncoordinated, a promising trend has emerged: very large cities (of over 4 million inhabitants) are more compact, discounting the population effect, on average, than larger (1 million to 4 million inhabitants) and intermediate cities (50 000 to 1 million inhabitants). Moreover, less compact agglomerations tend to have smaller buildings, flat, low skylines, less complete centres (reflecting a less optimal use of space) and polycentric patterns (i.e. multiple centres, rather than a single, monocentric city). This report analyses the consequences of less compact agglomerations for sustainability and liveability. The disadvantages include higher energy demand, less accessibility to services and opportunities, less walkable urban landscapes and greater car dependency, in addition to higher outdoor air pollution. It also considers the potential trade-offs with resilience; for example, compactness can lead to a loss of green space and an increase of urban heat island effects. The report offers opportunities in the coming years to single out potential areas of action for resilience, as well as for monitoring and evaluating progress.
  • 4-September-2023

    English

    Regional demand helps Emerging Asia cope with external headwinds

    Robust domestic demand will help Emerging Asian economies to cope with external headwinds. They are projected to grow by 5,3% on average in 2023 and by 5,5% in 2024. For the member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), real GDP growth is forecast to weaken to 4,2% in 2023 and grow by 4,7% in 2024.

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  • 3-September-2023

    English

    Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India - Volume 2023 Issue 1

    The Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India is a regular publication on regional economic growth and development in Emerging Asia. It focuses on the economic conditions of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member countries: Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam. It also addresses relevant economic issues in China and India to fully reflect developments in the region. This Update presents the region’s economic outlook, depicting rapidly changing trends and macroeconomic challenges amidst external headwinds.
  • 29-August-2023

    English

    OECD converts complete 2018 and final 2019 Creditor Reporting System (CRS) data into XML format, by donor and by recipient

    The OECD now provides the Creditor Reporting System (CRS) 2018 and final 2019 data available in XML format. CRS data on development finance can now be downloaded in four different formats and cater to different audiences.

  • 29-August-2023

    English

    DAC and CRS code lists

    OECD maintains various codes lists which are used by donors to report on their aid flows to the DAC databases. In addition, these codes are used to classify information in the DAC databases.

  • 29-August-2023

    English

    Annex 2 List of ODA-eligible international organisations

    In reporting their ODA, donor countries refer to a List of ODA-eligible international organisations, including multilateral agencies, international NGOs, networks and PPPs.

  • 8-August-2023

    English

    Economic and Financial Crime

    Economic and financial crime, faced by donors and developing countries alike is a major obstacle to development. Resources that could support a country’s development are lost through criminal acts like corruption, tax evasion, money laundering, and others.

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