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  • 20-April-2020

    English

    Common Ground Between the Paris Agreement and the Sendai Framework - Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction

    Countries are faced with the growing challenge of managing increasing risks from climate change and climate variability, putting development and the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals at risk. The adoption in 2015 of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Paris Agreement on climate change provides a clear mandate for increased coherence in countries’ approaches to climate and disaster risk reduction. Countries increasingly recognise the benefits of improved coherence between the two policy areas, exemplified by the number of countries that either have developed joint strategies or put in place processes that facilitate co-ordination. Informed by the country approaches of Ghana, Peru and the Philippines, in addition to a review of relevant literature, this report examines the potential for increased coherence in approaches to climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction across levels of government and sectors. It identifies ways in which government officials, development co-operation and other stakeholders can support efforts to further enhance coherence between the two policy areas, not only in the three case study countries, but also those in other countries as well as providers of development co-operation.
  • 9-avril-2020

    Français

    Déclaration conjointe du Comité d'aide au développement de l'OCDE sur la crise de Covid-19

    Les membres du Comité d'aide au développement (CAD) de l'OCDE ont publié aujourd'hui une déclaration exprimant leur soutien à la réponse des agences des Nations Unies, des banques multilatérales de développement et de la société civile à la crise mondiale du Covid-19, et saluant les appels des dirigeants du G20 et du G7 à se concentrer sur l'impact sur les pays en développement.

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  • 20-March-2020

    English

    Burkina Faso’s Perspective on Total Official Support for Sustainable Development (TOSSD)

    This working paper presents the main findings of the pilot study conducted in Burkina Faso in 2019 as part of the development of the statistical measurement framework for 'Total Official Support for Sustainable Development (TOSSD)'. The pilot study includes Burkina Faso’s perspective on the statistical methodology of TOSSD, first orders of magnitude of TOSSD to Burkina, as well as a statistical capacity assessment of Burkina Faso to access, collate, collect, analyse and use data on external financing in support of sustainable development.
  • 19-March-2020

    English

    Climate Change: OECD DAC External Development Finance Statistics

    The OECD DAC measures and monitors development finance targeting climate change objectives using two Rio markers: Climate Change Mitigation and Climate Change Adaptation.

  • 13-March-2020

    English

    Illicit financial flows: Artisanal and small-scale gold mining in Ghana and Liberia

    Illicit financial flows (IFFs) generated by the artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) sector in West Africa have historically contributed to conflict and instability, although it would be a mistake to classify this issue as a criminal matter, given its links to formal and informal networks and local livelihoods. This study examines IFFs associated with the ASGM sector in Ghana and Liberia and reveals a complex web of informal and illicit activity associated with IFFs, with detrimental consequences for development. It focuses on gold because of its prominence in the West African Region and artisanal small-scale mining (ASM), rather than large-scale mining (LSM). Further, ASMG is largely informal and consequently more vulnerable to exploitation by criminal networks, and plays a prominent role as a local livelihood. This case study is relatively narrow in focus, providing insights into the nature and scope of ASGM activities and their resulting IFFs, and making several observations on those areas where action could be taken in an effort to reduce IFF risks. The study selected Ghana and Liberia as two countries where research could be conducted, and where gold is a major industry.
  • 9-March-2020

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 6-March-2020

    English

    Why does inclusion matter? - Assessing the links between inclusive processes and inclusive outcomes

    Inclusion in terms of both process (how decisions are made and who is included in that process and how and why) and outcomes (how wealth and prosperity are distributed and shared across a population and why) is a leading priority in international development, with the Sustainable Development Goals as perhaps the most ambitious articulation of this. As the evidence overwhelmingly shows, over the long term, more open and inclusive states and societies tend to be more prosperous, effective and resilient. And yet, it is far less clear how countries that can be considered more inclusive in terms of both process and outcome got to where they are. This paper explores the relationship between inclusive governance and inclusive development, which is complex and non-linear. Analysing existing research on the politics of development, it finds that there is no automatic causal relationship between inclusion as process and inclusion as outcome in either direction. The paper then highlights several factors that have been important in fostering inclusive development through inclusive governance. By way of conclusion, the paper draws out a few key implications for how international development actors can support inclusion more effectively through more politically aware ways of thinking and working.
  • 5-March-2020

    English

    Annex 2 List of ODA-eligible international organisations

    In reporting their ODA, donor countries refer to a List of ODA-eligible international organisations, including multilateral agencies, international NGOs, networks and PPPs.

  • 4-March-2020

    English

    What does "inclusive governance" mean? - Clarifying theory and practice

    Inclusion in terms of both process (how decisions are made and who is included in that process and how and why) and outcomes (how wealth and prosperity are distributed and shared across a population and why) is a leading priority in international development, with the Sustainable Development Goals as perhaps the most ambitious articulation of this. As the evidence overwhelmingly shows, over the long term, more open and inclusive states and societies tend to be more prosperous, effective and resilient. And yet, it is far less clear how countries that today can be considered more inclusive in terms of both process and outcome got to where they are. This Note explores the relationship between inclusive governance and inclusive development. It finds that there is no automatic causal relationship between inclusion as process and inclusion as outcome in either direction. However, the Note also highlights that under certain circumstances, more inclusive processes can in fact foster more inclusive development, and it teases out several factors that have been important in in this respect. By way of conclusion, the paper draws out implications for how international development actors can support inclusion more effectively through more politically aware ways of thinking and working.
  • 4-March-2020

    English

    Mission drawdowns: Financing a sustainable peace - Sustaining gains and supporting economic stability post UN mission withdrawal

    Successful transitions are vital; providing the means to secure the gains achieved through UN missions. A carefully managed transition process is one of the best ways to guard against backslide and to ensure the continuity of essential peacebuilding and conflict prevention efforts. As part of this, it will be important to build and reinforce the essential foundations for economic stability, and to maintain financing for peace programming post-withdrawal. Therefore, the overall objective of this research was to address the systemic challenges of financing UN Mission transitions, by outlining opportunities to ensure that: the potentially negative economic impacts and disruptions of UN Mission transitions are mitigated; financing for peacebuilding programmes is sustained post mission withdrawal; and domestic economic growth is sustained and supported where possible. This paper combines global trends and research on peace operation transitions with findings from case studies in DRC (initial stages of MONUSCO transition), Haiti (handover from MINUJUSH to BINUH), Liberia (following UNMIL’s withdrawal) and Sudan (transition of UNAMID). The paper focuses on opportunities that the international community could integrate into programming, co-ordination and financing. Accordingly, the paper is structured around the three phases of transition – ongoing UN missions, the transition, and sustaining capacity and economic stability post-withdrawal.
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