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  • 3-August-2020

    English

    Key trends in development co-operation for national data and statistical systems

    This policy paper sheds light on current trends in development co-operation for data and statistical systems in developing countries. It analyses trends in funding through official development assistance as well as strategic priorities and modalities for providing support. It identifies different approaches to capacity development and discusses their strengths, opportunities and risks. The objectives of the research published in this paper are twofold: first, to understand key challenges to ensuring support is effective, owned by partners, aligned with their priorities and needs, and conducive to producing capacity and results that outlive specific projects and; second, with a view to identifying good practices, to provide insights on how Development Assistance Committee members support statistics and statistical capacity development in developing countries.
  • 30-July-2020

    English

    Climate Change: OECD DAC External Development Finance Statistics

    The OECD DAC measures and monitors development finance targeting climate change objectives using two Rio markers: Climate Change Mitigation and Climate Change Adaptation.

  • 30-July-2020

    English

    Small Island Developing States - SIDS

    Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have weathered storms, hurricanes and cyclones for centuries. Today’s climate change is intensifying these disasters and creating new development problems. Rising sea levels to increasing ocean acidity challenge not only the development but also the very existence of SIDS.

  • 30-July-2020

    English

    Donors agree on aid treatment of debt relief

    Members of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC), comprised of 29 donor countries and the EU, have agreed on a method for reporting debt relief as official development assistance (ODA).

    Related Documents
  • 30-July-2020

    English

    Donors agree on aid treatment of debt relief

    Members of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC), comprised of 29 donor countries and the EU, have agreed on a method for reporting debt relief as official development assistance (ODA).

    Related Documents
  • 23-June-2020

    English

    Innovation for Development Impact - Lessons from the OECD Development Assistance Committee

    The development co-operation community needs to innovate to meet the global challenges ahead. Although it has an established track record for innovating partnerships, funding instruments and technologies, they are not enough to deliver the Sustainable Development Goals. This report synthesises the lessons emerging from an OECD Development Assistance Committee peer learning exercise on how innovation efforts can be strengthened, individually and collectively, to achieve the 2030 Agenda. The report is organised around three blocks – strategy, management and culture; organisation and collaboration; and, the innovation process – and provides recommendations on how innovation can best benefit poor and vulnerable people around the world.
  • 16-June-2020

    English

    Development Co-operation Profiles

    The OECD’s Development Co-operation Profiles compile and analyse verified statistics and trends on how development assistance is allocated geographically, to sectors, multilateral and civil society organisations, cross-cutting priorities such as gender equality and women’s economic empowerment and the environment and climate, and to mobilise private finance. The profiles cover official and philanthropic providers of aid, official development assistance (ODA) and development finance. These providers include members of the OECD and its Development Assistance Committee (DAC), other countries and philanthropic foundations. The profiles also give an overview of key strategic and policy priorities for development co-operation, the institutional set-up and evaluation systems. The Development Co-operation Profiles are published annually and are a pillar of the OECD’s Development Co-operation Report . For more than 50 years, the Development Co-operation Report has brought new evidence, analysis and ideas to the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and international community more broadly, shaping policy reform, behaviour change and promoting best practices in development co-operation. Each year the report analyses a fresh policy issue that is timely, relevant or challenging for development co-operation policy and finance. The main report also includes shorter profiles of each provider that present key trends through infographics.
  • 11-June-2020

    English

    How Islamic finance contributes to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals

    This report identifies the opportunities that Islamic finance presents for donors. To achieve these, Arab and OECD Development Assistance Committee donors need to mobilise innovative forms of financing and deliver the call to deepen the transformation of development finance systems. DAC members could do so by broadening and deepening exposure to alternative forms of financing, such as Islamic finance. Islamic finance represents USD 2.5 trillion – a share of which could be mobilised for development – and its tenets resonate across the member countries of the Organisation for Islamic Cooperation and beyond. Arab donors could harness Islamic finance, as a means to strengthen partnerships with DAC members, whilst increasing the effectiveness of existing aid flows in countries and contexts where they have considerable access. Doing so could create a more equitable and stable development finance order capable of delivering the SDGs and achieve greater impact in partner countries. Both communities would then be able to chart a path for all development actors, notably the private sector, development finance institutions and other bilateral donors. This report provides a set of action points for Arab and DAC donors, highlighting the benefits of engaging in and co-operating through Islamic finance.
  • 10-June-2020

    English

    Digital transformation and the futures of civic space to 2030

    Digital transformation is rapidly altering civic space, challenging the ways in which members of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and other providers of development co-operation strive to promote an enabling environment for civil society to contribute to sustainable development. This paper aims to support DAC members and other providers of development co-operation to integrate the implications of a range of plausible futures of civic space into positive policy action today. To this end, it provides an overview of the variables (i.e. current trends, drivers of change and uncertainties) that may determine the trajectory of civic space in the context of digital transformation; identifies four plausible futures that emerge from four different logical interactions of these variables - that could materialise over a ten-year horizon and be fully realised by 2030; and draws policy implications to support DAC members and other providers in designing development cooperation policies that best leverage the opportunities that digital transformation offers while mitigating its risks.
  • 3-June-2020

    English

    Managing and measuring the impact of sustainable investments - A two-axes mapping

    To mobilise and align finance to the SDGs, and, most importantly, to achieve impact, both public and private actors need to implement effective impact measurement and management practices. Impact management enables investors, enterprises and other stakeholders to include positive and negative impact considerations into investment and business decisions. Impact measurement allows organisations to set impact objectives, monitor impact performance and evaluate impact. The increasing focus of investors on 'impact' has led to the development of a large number of principles, frameworks, standards, certifications, tools and indicators for impact management and measurement. The crowded nature of this space and the multiplicity and different understanding of terms and concepts makes it hard to navigate. This paper attempts to bring some clarity in this space, by proposing a two-axes mapping of the existing (i) principles, (ii) frameworks and methodologies, (iii) standards, certifications and ratings and (iv) metrics and indicators to manage and measure impact of sustainable investments targeting the SDGs. In addition, the paper applies the mapping approach to a series of existing initiatives, highlighting the complexity and range of principles, frameworks, methodologies, standards and metrics that exist to measure and manage impact and providing interesting initial insights into the level of consensus in the space of investing for sustainable development.
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