Partager

By Date


  • 13-July-2021

    English

    Dynamics of farm performance and policy impacts: Main findings

    Increasing productivity at farm level is a key policy objective across most countries and fundamental to the overall performance of agricultural and food systems. This paper applies dynamic statistical methods to farm level data in order to identify the determinants of farm performance over time, in terms of productivity and measures of local sustainability. The analysis sheds light on the effects of policies on productivity, and the links between productivity and sustainability outcomes. It draws on key findings from seven case studies: crop farms in Australia, France, Italy and the United Kingdom (England and Wales); and dairy farms in the Czech Republic, Denmark and Norway, with different sample periods, from the most recent three decades to the last five years. A key finding is that policy changes increasing the degree of decoupling of payments have a positive impact on productivity. Furthermore, with the right incentives, productivity growth can be more locally sustainable insofar as farms can produce more output with less inputs that harm the environment. The detailed background work on the seven samples of crops and dairy farms in the above countries is available in OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Paper N°165.
  • 13-July-2021

    English

    Dynamics of farm performance and policy impacts: Case studies - Case Studies

    This paper provides detailed farm level data evidence on the dynamics of farm performance from case studies covering crop farms in Australia, France, Italy and the United Kingdom (England and Wales), and dairy farms in the Czech Republic, Denmark and Norway, with different recent sample periods of five to thirty years. An increase in productivity over time is common to all countries and most crop farm classes, but productivity dynamics vary significantly. In Australia, strong productivity growth among the most productive crop farms has led to an increase in the gap between the highest and lowest performing farms; whereas in France, Italy and the United Kingdom, productivity growth was weak among the most productive crop farms and the lowest performing farms closed the productivity gap. Productivity also increased among dairy farms, with an increasing gap between the most and the least productive farm classes in the three sample countries. The impact of policy changes on performance dynamics is analysed for decoupled payments in France and England, and dairy payments in the Czech Republic. The main findings across countries and policy implications are discussed in OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Paper N°164.
  • 23-June-2021

    English

    Housing Affordability in Cities in the Czech Republic

    While the full effects of the COVID-19 crisis on housing affordability in cities in the Czech Republic remain to be seen, the pandemic has reinforced the urgency of tackling pre-existing challenges, such as a consistent shortage of housing supply in cities and structural obstacles for urban households to access affordable housing. While the Czech national government has taken a number of emergency measures to help people keep their homes during the COVID-19 crisis, this report recommends that Czech national and local governments need to implement both direct and indirect policy instruments more effectively to shape a more sustainable and inclusive urban paradigm. Direct policy instruments consist in targeting housing affordability specifically, for example by providing more social housing to households most in need. Indirect instruments such as local land-use planning can help increase the supply of affordable housing. This report also contains the results from an innovative survey that the OECD and the Ministry of Regional Development conducted on more than 1 800 municipalities to collect data on the housing market and housing policies at the municipal level.
  • 17-June-2021

    English

    Fighting Tax Crime – The Ten Global Principles, Second Edition

    First published in 2017, Fighting Tax Crime - The Ten Global Principles is the first comprehensive guide to fighting tax crimes. It sets out ten essential principles covering the legal, institutional, administrative, and operational aspects necessary for developing an efficient and effective system for identifying, investigating and prosecuting tax crimes, while respecting the rights of accused taxpayers. This second edition addresses new challenges, such as tackling professionals who enable tax and white-collar crimes, and fostering international co-operation in the recovery of assets. Drawing on the experiences of jurisdictions in all continents, the report also highlights successful cases relating to the misuse of virtual assets, complex investigations involving joint task forces, and the use of new technology tools to fight tax crimes and other financial crimes. The Ten Global Principles are an essential element of the OECD’s Oslo Dialogue, a whole-of-government approach for fighting tax crimes and illicit financial flows. Alongside the policy document, the second edition is joined by 33 country chapters, detailing jurisdictions’ domestic tax crime enforcement frameworks as well as the progress made in implementing the Ten Global Principles. These chapters are available separately online.
  • 17-June-2021

    English

    Towards a national strategic framework for the circular economy in the Czech Republic - Analysis and a proposed set of key elements

    The past decades have witnessed unprecedented growth in global consumption of raw materials, which also lead to increased environmental pressures. As a response to these challenges, countries across the world have made the transition to a circular economy one of their policy priorities. This report develops a set of key elements of a strategic framework for the circular economy in the Czech Republic, which the government is developing (Circular Czechia 2040). It discusses the rationale for transitioning to a circular economy in the Czech Republic and provides an in-depth analysis of four priority areas: consumption and consumers, waste management, economic instruments, as well as research innovation and digitalisation. The report also suggests 40 concrete policy measures to help implement the strategic framework, along with a monitoring framework to measure the progress made. This report was co-funded by the European Union via the Structural Reform Support Programme.
  • 15-June-2021

    English, PDF, 395kb

    OECD Skills Outlook 2021: How does the Czech Republic compare?

    The Skills Outlook Country Profile details key indicators to assess the extent to which the Czech Republic is able to provide strong foundations for lifelong learning; promote effective transitions into further education, training and the labour market and engage adults in learning. It also evaluates the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on adult learning and the labour market.

    Related Documents
  • 19-May-2021

    English, PDF, 177kb

    Preventing Harmful Alcohol Use: Key Findings for the Czech Republic

    The Czech Republic has one of the highest levels of alcohol consumption – 14.4 litres of pure alcohol per capita per year, roughly equivalent to 3 bottles of wine or 5.5 litres of beer per week per person aged 15 and over. In addition, in the Czech Republic, some population groups are at higher risk than others.

  • 14-April-2021

    English

    Assessment of the air pollution tax and emission concentration limits in the Czech Republic

    This paper assesses the design of the air pollution tax in conjunction with a stringency analysis of the emission concentration limits in the Czech Republic. The analysis draws upon a detailed database containing environmental reporting by industrial stationary sources. The assessment of the emission concentration limits focuses on analysing the shift of the statutory limits between 2013 and 2017 and the corresponding real-life measured concentration on individual source basis. It provides an assessment of stringency of the air protection instrument and also of the vintage differentiation applied in the form of transitional schemes. The stringency analysis of the emission concentration limits stringency is related to the air pollution tax relief provision.
  • 16-February-2021

    English

    A simulation framework to project pension spending: The Czech pension system

    This paper presents a simulation framework developed to assess the impact of ageing on the financial sustainability of the Czech pension system. It accompanies the publication OECD Reviews of Pension Systems: Czech Republic. The framework has two components: a macroeconomic model to project long-term GDP and a cohort model to simulate the evolution of pensions. The macroeconomic model takes into account the evolution of the labour force and productivity. The cohort model simulates the career of a representative sample of the working-age population and their path in retirement. It replicates and projects the main features of the labour market, in particular, participation, wage and unemployment. It captures non-linear features of the pension system and distributional effects. The model estimates and simulates the main demographic variables of the pension system, in particular, the number of old-age pensioners and disability pensioners. It allows to simulate different policy options to close the financing gap of the pension system. Pension spending is projected to increase to 11.9% of GDP in 2060 from 8.2% in 2018, leading to increasing deficits of the pension system. Among the different options to close the financing gap, further increasing the retirement age after 2030 in line with life expectancy gains appears to be the most efficient policy measure to boost growth and reduce the financing needs. However, additional measures would be needed to close the financing gap of the pension system.
  • 2-February-2021

    English

    Positive, High-achieving Students? - What Schools and Teachers Can Do

    The work of teachers matters in many different ways. Not only do they provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to thrive in the labour market, but they also help develop the social-emotional skills that are vital for students’ personal development and for their active citizenship. But how do teachers best achieve this? By linking 2018 data from the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) with evidence from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) – known as the TALIS-PISA link – this report aims to identify the teacher and school factors that matter most for student achievement and social-emotional development. The report uses a data-driven approach – based on machine learning and standard regression analyses – to identify the dimensions that are most strongly linked with student outcomes, and then combines this with a careful review of theory and previous research to analyse and interpret the findings. These findings provide a rich illustration of the many ways in which teachers and school leaders might influence the success of their students, acting as a tool for educators to reflect upon their own practice. Finally, the report offers several directions for education policy.
  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>