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Policy Briefs


  • 21-October-2021

    English

    COVID-19 emergency government support and ensuring a level playing field on the road to recovery

    This brief considers ways to ensure that short-term COVID-19 crisis responses do not result in unintended negative implications for competition and trade in the medium- and long-term. It highlights the competition and trade policy tools governments can use to effectively balance the needs of pandemic responses while ensuring that they do not undermine efforts to maintain a level playing field, domestically and globally.

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  • 31-October-2016

    English, PDF, 347kb

    Indonesia Policy Brief: Dismantling Barriers to Competition and Innovation

    The performance of the Indonesian economy could be improved considerably by removing administrative and regulatory barriers to competition through a programme that reviews regulations.

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  • 1-July-2016

    English, PDF, 346kb

    Turkey Policy Brief: Removing administrative and regulatory barriers to competition

    The dynamism of Turkey’s business sector played a vital role in the country’s economic growth in the 2000s. However, because of competition-unfriendly product market regulations markets have not reaped the full benefits of this dynamism. Turkish authorities can help unlock growth potential by reviewing regulations and identifying where malfunctions are occurring.

  • 29-February-2016

    English, PDF, 340kb

    Costa Rica Policy Brief: Modernising Costa Rica's Competition Law

    Improving competition law and policy in Costa Rica should be a primary objective of the government. Such reforms could yield substantial economic and social benefits, through higher productivity, lower prices to consumers and better quality products and services.

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  • 30-September-2015

    English, PDF, 350kb

    Iceland Policy Brief: Boosting Productivity through Greater Competition

    Fostering competition can be a challenge given the small size of the Icelandic economy. In a number of important sectors, such as financial services, food and telecoms, only a few firms operate.

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  • 22-April-2015

    English, PDF, 367kb

    Portugal Policy Brief: Undertaking a Comprehensive Assessment to Identify Growth Enhancing Reforms

    Recent structural reforms have improved Portugal’s competitiveness and long-term growth prospects. However, this generally positive message conceals significant variations between sectors and also obscures the very substantial opportunities that further reforms can bring.

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  • 16-September-2014

    English, PDF, 659kb

    Policy Brief: Taxing Multinational Enterprises - Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) II

    The September 2014 update on the BEPS Action Plan, including the delivery of the first set of measures from the BEPS Project as well as enhanced engagement with developing countries.

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  • 8-September-2014

    English, PDF, 509kb

    Policy Brief: Taxing Multinational Enterprises - Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS)

    BEPS strategies often take advantage of the interaction between the tax rules of different jurisdictions, so only an internationally co-ordinated effort can effectively respond to this issue. The BEPS Action Plan is based on three core principles: coherence, substance and transparency, and sets forth 15 actions to fundamentally change the rules for the taxation of cross-border profits.

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  • 18-mai-2011

    Français, , 517kb

    L’impact des réformes structurelles sur les déséquilibres des balances courantes

    À l'échelle mondiale, les déséquilibres des balances courantes se sont sensiblement creusés dans les années qui ont précédé la crise économique.

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  • 16-January-2007

    English, Excel, 142kb

    Policy Brief: Competition and Barriers to Entry

    Before a firm can compete in a market, it has to be able to enter it. Many markets have at least some impediments that make it more difficult for a firm to enter a market. A debate over how to define the term “barriers to entry” began decades ago, however, and it has yet to be won. Some scholars have argued, for example, that an obstacle is not an entry barrier if incumbent firms faced it when they entered the market. Others contend

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