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  • 17-September-2020

    English

    States of fragility and official development assistance

    This paper analyses official development assistance (ODA) to the 57 fragile contexts in the 2020 OECD fragility framework. ODA is a crucial, reliable resource for these fragile contexts and an indispensable part of their journey to sustainable development and peace. DAC members spent 63% of their net, country-allocable ODA in these contexts in 2018. Striving to protect this ODA, especially in light of the economic consequences of coronavirus (COVID-19), will be important to maintain sustainable development progress in fragile contexts as the ‘Decade of Action’ begins for Agenda 2030.
  • 17-September-2020

    English

    Considering human capital in a multidimensional analysis of fragility

    In 2022, the OECD will add a human capital dimension to its fragility framework in acknowledgement of the ambition set forth in States of Fragility 2018 to 'never lose sight of the end goal of delivering hope and better lives for all people in fragile contexts'. The COVID-19 pandemic and its associated fiscal, political and social shocks has brought the urgency of investment in human capital into sharper focus. With less than ten years left to go on Agenda 2030, success will mean placing further focus on the building blocks of sustainable development: health (including proper nutrition), education and financial support to those who need it through investments in social protection. This working paper builds the case for why human capital matters for fragility, and why investment in human capital can help develop more inclusive, peaceful and resilient societies.
  • 8-September-2020

    English

    Sustainable Ocean for All - Harnessing the Benefits of Sustainable Ocean Economies for Developing Countries

    Adopting more sustainable ways of managing the ocean is a global priority: protecting its health will bring benefits to all. Developing countries face specific challenges, as many depend heavily on ocean-based industries and are overly exposed to the consequences of ocean degradation. Enhancing their access to science, policy advice and financing would allow them to tap better into the opportunities of a more sustainable ocean economy, including more decent jobs, cleaner energy, improved food security and enhanced resilience, while contributing to the protection of the world’s ocean. This report provides policy makers in developing countries, as well as their development co-operation partners with a wealth of fresh evidence on (i) the latest trends in selected ocean-based industries; (ii) policy instruments, including economic incentives, to promote ocean sustainability in various contexts; (iii) the first review of development finance and development co-operation practices in support of more sustainable ocean economies, including a discussion of how development co-operation can help re-orient private finance towards sustainability.
  • 11-août-2020

    Français

    Gestion axée sur les résultats en matière de développement durable

    Ces principes de 2019 aident les fournisseurs de développement et de coopération humanitaire à surmonter des défis complexes pour atteindre les résultats escomptés en termes de développement durable. S'appuyant sur les principes de la gestion axée sur les résultats du développement, adoptés par les agences de développement lors de la table ronde internationale sur les résultats à Marrakech (février 2004), ils ont défini une pratique renouvelée qui prend en compte l'évolution du contexte mondial et l'élargissement de l’éventail des acteurs.
  • 3-August-2020

    English

    Key trends in development co-operation for national data and statistical systems

    This policy paper sheds light on current trends in development co-operation for data and statistical systems in developing countries. It analyses trends in funding through official development assistance as well as strategic priorities and modalities for providing support. It identifies different approaches to capacity development and discusses their strengths, opportunities and risks. The objectives of the research published in this paper are twofold: first, to understand key challenges to ensuring support is effective, owned by partners, aligned with their priorities and needs, and conducive to producing capacity and results that outlive specific projects and; second, with a view to identifying good practices, to provide insights on how Development Assistance Committee members support statistics and statistical capacity development in developing countries.
  • 30-July-2020

    English

    Small Island Developing States - SIDS

    Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have weathered storms, hurricanes and cyclones for centuries. Today’s climate change is intensifying these disasters and creating new development problems. Rising sea levels to increasing ocean acidity challenge not only the development but also the very existence of SIDS.

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  • 30-July-2020

    English

    Donors agree on aid treatment of debt relief

    Members of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC), comprised of 29 donor countries and the EU, have agreed on a method for reporting debt relief as official development assistance (ODA).

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  • 30-juillet-2020

    Français

    Les donneurs s’entendent sur la comptabilisation de l’allégement de la dette dans l’aide

    Les membres du Comité d’aide au développement (CAD) de l’OCDE, lequel se compose de 29 pays donneurs plus l’Union européenne, se sont mis d’accord sur une méthode de comptabilisation des opérations d’allégement de la dette dans l’aide publique au développement (APD).

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  • 11-June-2020

    English

    How Islamic finance contributes to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals

    This report identifies the opportunities that Islamic finance presents for donors. To achieve these, Arab and OECD Development Assistance Committee donors need to mobilise innovative forms of financing and deliver the call to deepen the transformation of development finance systems. DAC members could do so by broadening and deepening exposure to alternative forms of financing, such as Islamic finance. Islamic finance represents USD 2.5 trillion – a share of which could be mobilised for development – and its tenets resonate across the member countries of the Organisation for Islamic Cooperation and beyond. Arab donors could harness Islamic finance, as a means to strengthen partnerships with DAC members, whilst increasing the effectiveness of existing aid flows in countries and contexts where they have considerable access. Doing so could create a more equitable and stable development finance order capable of delivering the SDGs and achieve greater impact in partner countries. Both communities would then be able to chart a path for all development actors, notably the private sector, development finance institutions and other bilateral donors. This report provides a set of action points for Arab and DAC donors, highlighting the benefits of engaging in and co-operating through Islamic finance.
  • 10-June-2020

    English

    Digital transformation and the futures of civic space to 2030

    Digital transformation is rapidly altering civic space, challenging the ways in which members of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and other providers of development co-operation strive to promote an enabling environment for civil society to contribute to sustainable development. This paper aims to support DAC members and other providers of development co-operation to integrate the implications of a range of plausible futures of civic space into positive policy action today. To this end, it provides an overview of the variables (i.e. current trends, drivers of change and uncertainties) that may determine the trajectory of civic space in the context of digital transformation; identifies four plausible futures that emerge from four different logical interactions of these variables - that could materialise over a ten-year horizon and be fully realised by 2030; and draws policy implications to support DAC members and other providers in designing development cooperation policies that best leverage the opportunities that digital transformation offers while mitigating its risks.
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