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Changing skills needs

The current megatrends, and particularly digitalisation and the transition to a low-carbon economy, imply rapid changes in the skills needed to adapt and succeed in a constantly evolving labour market. The ELS Skills Team of the OECD helps countries and individuals prepare for these changes by measuring and forecasting skills needs. Some of our work in this area includes the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC), thematic analysis on the links between skills and key labour market outcomes, and the assessment of the impact of digitalisation and the transition to a low-carbon economy on skills needs and adult-learning systems.

Data and tools

Thumbnail of the Skills for Jobs dataviz developed by the ELS Skills Team (265x265) Thumbnail of the Automation Tool developed by the ELS Skills Team (265x265) Thumbnail for the platform Competenze e Lavoro
What skills are in demand in your country? Discover more on our Skills for Jobs dataviz! What does the future hold for your job? Take our Future of Jobs survey to find out. What are the skills requirements and labour market demand in Italy? Check out our platform!

 

Current and forthcoming projects

Working for Health

The ELS Skills Team in collaboration with the International Labour Organization is scanning how countries anticipate the skill needs of the health workforce, and how this information is used to build more resilient health workforces. Even prior to the pandemic, health workforces in most OECD countries were under strain, with shortages reported both in terms of numbers of professionals and in terms of the skills needed to deliver quality healthcare. Population ageing will continue to increase the demand for healthcare-related services, while technological change is likely to alter which skills are required by health professionals going forward.

  

Skills for the Green Transition

The transition to a green economy will involve difficult changes in labour markets. Countries will need to promote and facilitate the re-allocation of workers away from carbon-intensive occupations towards green jobs. The ELS Skills Team has started to do some preliminary work on how governments can evaluate the skills requirements of the green transition and best prepare the adult learning systems to cope with these changes. To help inform the work, it contributed to organise a foresight exercise that aimed to identify no-regret labour market and skills policies that governments should pursue to fuel the green transition.