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  • 12-January-2022

    English

    Measuring effective taxation of housing - Building the foundations for policy reform

    This paper measures the effective taxation of housing investments in 40 OECD member and partner countries. The paper derives both Marginal Effective Tax Rates (METRs) and Average Effective Tax Rates (AETRs), which incorporate the stream of income and taxes over the life of the housing investment. The methodology is applied to owner-occupied and rented residential property for investments that are financed with debt or equity. The paper finds that the level and components of housing taxation depend greatly on the investment scenario. Effective tax rates vary substantially depending on the holding period, rate of return, tenure (owner-occupied or rented), financing scenario, and the inflation rate. Effective tax rates do not vary much with the taxpayer’s income and wealth or with the rate of return. The paper finds there is scope to reduce the tax differential between different investment scenarios and strengthen progressivity and horizontal equity.
  • 21-December-2021

    English

    News: Public consultations on the implementation aspects of Pillar One and Pillar Two

    Following the political agreement reached in October 2021 by over 135 countries to address the tax challenges arising from the digitalisation and globalisation of the economy, work on the implementation aspects of reform is underway. See how the 140+ members of the Inclusive Framework on BEPS intend to consult stakeholders during this next phase.

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  • 20-December-2021

    English

    Fiscal Federalism 2022 - Making Decentralisation Work

    Fiscal Federalism 2022 surveys recent trends and policies in intergovernmental fiscal relations and subnational government. Accessible and easy-to-read chapters provide insight into: good practices in fiscal federalism; the design of fiscal equalisation systems; measuring subnational tax and spending autonomy; promoting public sector performance across levels of government; digitalisation challenges and opportunities; the role of subnational accounting and insolvency frameworks; funding and financing of local government public investment; and early lessons from the COVID-19 crisis for intergovernmental fiscal relations.
  • 20-December-2021

    English

  • 20-December-2021

    English

    Tax Challenges Arising from the Digitalisation of the Economy – Global Anti-Base Erosion Model Rules (Pillar Two)

    In October 2021, over 135 jurisdictions joined a ground breaking plan to update key elements of the international tax system which is no longer fit for purpose in a globalised and digitalised economy. The Global Anti-Base Erosion Rules (GloBE) are a key component of this plan and ensure large multinational enterprise pay a minimum level of tax on the income arising in each of the jurisdictions where they operate.

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  • 17-December-2021

    English

    Heads of tax administration prioritise collaboration on the implementation of the Two-Pillar Solution, digital transformation and capacity building

    The OECD’s Forum on Tax Administration held its 14th Plenary meeting on 16-17 December 2021, bringing together tax commissioners from across the globe as well as representatives from international organisations and regional tax administration bodies.

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  • 16-December-2021

    English

    Supporting the Digitalisation of Developing Country Tax Administrations

    This report has been produced by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration in collaboration with the African Tax Administration Forum (ATAF). The primary purpose of the report is to share information that will assist developing country tax administrations as they consider digitalisation, facilitate dialogue among tax officials on tax administration issues, and identify opportunities to improve tax administration ICT systems.

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  • 15-December-2021

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Africa 2021

    The publication Revenue Statistics in Africa is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration and the OECD Development Centre, the African Union Commission (AUC) and the African Tax Administration Forum (ATAF) with the financial support of the European Union. It compiles comparable tax revenue and non‑tax revenue statistics for 30 countries in Africa: Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eswatini, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, South Africa, Togo, Tunisia and Uganda. The model is the OECD Revenue Statistics database which is a fundamental reference, backed by a well‑established methodology. Extending the OECD methodology to African countries enables comparisons about tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among African economies and with OECD, Latin American, Caribbean, Asian and Pacific economies. SPECIAL FEATURE: Public debt in Africa and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic
  • 15-December-2021

    English

    Africa: The rising debt burden highlights the need for further progress in domestic revenue mobilisation

    Successful efforts to increase tax revenues and boost domestic revenue mobilisation in African economies over the last decade have been offset by rising debt-service costs, which amounted to almost two-thirds of the increased revenues generated between 2010 and 2019, according to a new report.

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  • 14-December-2021

    English

    The Seychelles and Iceland deposit new notifications under the Multilateral BEPS Convention

    The MLI has already started to impact the bilateral treaties of 68 jurisdictions that have ratified it. From 1 January 2022, it is expected to impact over 850 treaties concluded among those 68 jurisdictions, with an additional 900 treaties whose application would be modified once the MLI is ratified by all Signatories, thereby affecting a total of 1750 treaties worldwide.

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