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  • 31-August-2018

    English

    Enhancing Connectivity through Transport Infrastructure - The Role of Official Development Finance and Private Investment

    Transport infrastructure is crucial to connect developing countries and help them to boost trade, growth and regional integration. This is because cross-border or long-distance roads and railways as well as international ports and airports are needed to move products and people around in a globalised world.What can bilateral and multilateral development partners do to help connect developing countries through transport infrastructure? This report takes stock of continental and regional transport plans in Africa, Asia, Latin America and parts of Europe to place development co-operation in context. It then examines the strategies and activities of development partners for transport connectivity. It also takes a hard look at the allocation of official development finance for transport connectivity, particularly in relation to the distribution of private investment for the same types of infrastructure.How large is the financing gap for transport connectivity to meet the Sustainable Development Goals? What can development partners do to fill this gap? How can they create an environment that can help mobilise more private resources? The report provides a comprehensive picture of the current state of play as well as food for thought on what can be done to move forward. It also features 16 profiles of development partners and their activities for improving transport connectivity.
  • 24-July-2018

    English

    New Zealand - DAC Peer Review of Development Co-operation 2015

    While New Zealand is a comparatively small donor, it boasts an internationally-recognised aid programme with specific understanding of the unique Pacific context. It is seen as a flexible and predictable humanitarian donor.

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  • 17-July-2018

    English

    States of Fragility 2018

    Three years into the 2030 Agenda it is already apparent that those living in fragile contexts are the furthest behind. Not all forms of fragility make it to the public’s eye: fragility is an intricate beast, sometimes exposed, often lurking underneath, but always holding progress back. Conflict, forced displacement, violent extremism, famine etc. are all causes and consequences of fragility. Hence the need to better understand, anticipate and respond to fragility.States of Fragility 2018 exposes the critical challenge posed by fragility in achieving the aspirations of the 2030 Agenda, sustainable development and peace. It highlights twelve key aspects of fragility, defying common assumptions and simplistic categorisation. It documents progress made in fragile situations on attaining sustainable development, unveiling exit doors from the fragility trap. It then illustrates the current state of financing to address fragility and suggests more effective approaches, accounting for its multidimensionality.Above all, the report aims to strike a balance between fragility's inherent complexity and the degree of simplicity that is required for efficient policy and decision making, namely through systems-based thinking; longer-term, consistent aid plans; the financing of peace; and a persistent focus on human beings. 
  • 13-July-2018

    English

    Emerging Asia poised for continued strong growth, while contributing to global expansion of e-commerce

    Economic growth in Emerging Asia, the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), China and India, is expected to remain stable in the near term. Average real gross domestic product (GDP) in the region is expected to grow by 6.6% in 2018 and 6.5% in 2019.

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  • 10-July-2018

    English

    Mainstreaming Biodiversity for Sustainable Development

    The need to mainstream biodiversity into economic growth and development is being increasingly recognised and is now also firmly embedded in the Sustainable Development Goals. Drawing on experiences and insights from 16 predominantly megadiverse countries, this report examines how biodiversity is being mainstreamed in four key areas: 1) at the national level, including national development plans and other strategies, institutional co-ordination and national budgets; 2) the agriculture, forestry and fisheries sectors; 3) in development co-operation; and 4) the monitoring and evaluation of biodiversity mainstreaming and how this could be improved.
  • 1-June-2018

    English

    OECD strengthens engagement with partner countries during annual Ministerial Meeting

    The OECD took steps to deepen its engagement with Thailand, South Africa and Peru during the Organisation’s annual Ministerial Meeting and announced it will open an office in Istanbul to provide a base for its growing work with partner countries.

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  • 16-May-2018

    English

    Development in Transition

    The bipolar world of donors and recipients is giving way to a multi-polar world that embraces Development in Transition as a movement to rethink and redefine relations between all countries to better design policies at home and beyond to further and sustain development.

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  • 10-April-2018

    English

    Strengthening Shardara Multi-Purpose Water Infrastructure in Kazakhstan

    More than 8 000 large multi-purpose water infrastructures (MPWIs) around the world contribute to economic development, as well as water, food and energy security, encompassing all human-made water systems including dams, dykes, reservoirs and associated irrigation canals and water supply networks. Focused on the specific case of the Shardara MPWI located in Low Syr-Darya Basin, South Kazakhstan and Kyzyl-Orda oblasts (provinces) of Kazakhstan, this report looks at the choice and design of MPWI investment strategies that ensure a high economic return on investments and potential bankability, based on application of a computer model and lessons learned from 15 international MPWI case studies.
  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Development aid stable in 2017 with more sent to poorest countries

    Foreign aid from official donors totalled USD 146.6 billion in 2017, a small decrease of 0.6% from 2016 in real terms as less money was spent on refugees inside donor countries but with more funds flowing to countries most in need of aid, according to preliminary official data collected by the OECD.

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  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Regaining citizens’ trust in public institutions is key to resuming inclusive growth and well-being in Latin America and the Caribbean

    After five years of economic slowdown and a two-year recession in 2015-2016, LAC is on the path of a frail economic recovery. According to estimates in the Outlook, the region’s gross domestic product (GDP) is projected to increase again between 2 and 2.5% in 2018, after reaching 1.3% growth on average in 2017.

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